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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: HistoricalHistory. Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Albert DeSalvo

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Where:
Unknown
When:
Unknown
Summary:
In Boston in the 1960s, a series of murders led to widespread fear. Albert DeSalvo would confess to and be given a life sentence for his crimes as The Boston Strangler.

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Albert DeSalvo



  Where:
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  When:
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The city of Boston has been home to many historic events, some for better and some for worse. In the latter category, you have the story of the Boston Strangler, a man that had sent the citizens of the city into a frenzy during the 1960s. Many were looking over their shoulder while walking at night because of the Strangler and the media coverage that surrounded the story. For nearly three years, the Boston Strangler was at the forefront of everyone’s mind in the Boston area, and it was later discovered that the Strangler’s identity was that of Albert DeSalvo.Advertisements:


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Though there have been some that have doubted DeSalvo is the culprit behind the stranglings, there has been evidence brought forth in recent years that has silenced at least some of the doubters. In the extremely rare chance that DeSalvo wasn’t the Strangler, he still did some awful things in his life. Even more than 45 years after his death, DeSalvo is still a highly talked about serial killer.

Perhaps it was partly the media sending people into a panic that put the Strangler onto a pedestal in the minds of some people. The first murder had taken place on June 14, 1962, with several more violent attacks taking place over the course of the next few weeks. After that had happened, the Boston Herald released their first Sunday edition following the 4th of July weekend that alerted many to the Strangler, giving him catchy nicknames and giving an aura to the killer.

The Strangler was deranged, and would have been even if he didn’t finish each of his victims’ lives as he had performed some heinous acts on his victims. The span in age was also shocking to many, as they ranged from women in their late teens to their mid 80s. It seemed that no adult woman was off limits for the Strangler in his sick mind, though the only silver lining (if you can even call it that) is that nobody underage was involved.

The police had obviously been on the search for the Strangler, but he made it hard to track him as there weren’t signs of forced entry into the homes that he invaded. According to authorities, these women had trusted the Strangler or at least had the feeling that he wasn’t going to do any harm, letting him inside. At the same time as the Strangle claiming many victims, there was another string of crimes that the Boston Police were trying to track down.

In this other series of crimes, a man was posing as an officer that went into women’s’ homes, tying them up and forcing himself on them. He became known to many as the Green Man, though people didn’t know at first that the Strangler and the Green Man were the same person. It wasn’t until one woman that had been the victim of DeSalvo’s non-murder violence was able to point him out that his reign of terror had come to an end.

The police took DeSalvo into custody, where he wasn’t charged initially with the murders as they were still trying to connect the dots. DeSalvo might have still gotten away with murders, too, had he stayed silent in prison. DeSalvo told his cellmate about him being the Boston Strangler, who in turn told his lawyer who then offered to represent DeSalvo in court, ultimately failing to obtain an insanity plea.

Some had assumed there was a merit to the insanity plea that the defense tried to put forth, as DeSalvo had a very troubled childhood. His father drank pretty much whenever he wasn’t sleeping and was absurdly violent toward DeSalvo’s mother. Growing up in that broken home, DeSalvo started showing signs of instability at a young age, willingly committing crimes while also having the telltale sign of harming animals. Even with a long crime record by the time he became an adult, DeSalvo still joined the military where he was twice discharged and arrested once again.

Because of his history that dated back to his childhood, there were many that didn’t want DeSalvo to get the death penalty for his actions. Instead, many psychologists wanted DeSalvo alive to see why he’d want to commit such violent crimes and if there was anything to be learned in helping to prevent future serial killers. Due to a plea bargain, DeSalvo didn’t receive the death penalty, instead getting life in prison without parole.

That didn’t mean he’d stay for long initially, however, as he had escaped from prison in that first year before turning himself in after a few days. Upon his return to prison, DeSalvo changed his tune on being the Boston Strangler and was sent to maximum security. He went to his grave on the recantation, as he was stabbed in prison in late 1973 by a gang member for selling drugs at prices below what those gangs were selling them for in the prison.

Because he took back what he said about being the Boston Strangler, the case remained open for many years. The Boston Police had never formally charged DeSalvo as the Strangler before his death, and in the past few years discovered evidence that suggests he was indeed the Strangler, after all. DeSalvo’s nephew had found a water bottle nearly 50 years after the murders that had DeSalvo’s DNA on it.

The police used the DNA to test the possible match to the final victim of the murders, with a near perfect 99.9 percent of the DNA lining up. “This is good evidence,” Suffolk County District Attorney Dan Conley said. “This is strong evidence. This is reliable evidence.” Another Massachusetts Attorney General, Martha Coakley, said that “We may have solved one of the nation’s most notorious serial killings.” Though there are still some that doubt that the DNA link is enough to classify DeSalvo as the Boston Strangler, the authorities seem satisfied with the result and consider him to be the perpetrator unless new evidence arises.

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