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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Last Photo of The World's Most Loyal Dog

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Where:
Shibuya, Japan
When:
1935-03-08
Summary:
The corpse of Hachiko, a dog that has come to symbolize loyalty and the bond between humanity and man's best friend

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Last Photo of The World's Most Loyal Dog



  Where:
Shibuya, Japan

  When:
1935-03-08

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Next Photo
or read more about below

Dogs are among the most popular animals to keep as a pet, and for good reason. More people might have a fish or a cat, but dogs have a sense of loyalty that’s unmatched by any other animal. Many of us love dogs, even if we don’t have one, because we know how friendly they can be. We like to think of our own dogs as being the most loyal, but all of them pale in comparison to a dog known as Hachiko from Odate, Japan.

There have been some memorable dogs throughout history, but how many can be named by almost everyone in a country more than 70 years after its death? So what it is about Hachiko that made him so special? This fascinating story of this dog that was born in 1923 will not only melt your heart, but also have you petting your dog for the rest of the day.

Hachiko was a Akita Inu that was adopted by a University of Tokyo professor named Hidesaburo Ueno. Hakito was so loyal to Ueno that he would leave the house at the proper time everyday to make sure that he greeted his owner at the nearby train station when he arrived home from work. This went on for a year after Ueno adopted Hachiko, but then tragedy would strike in May of 1925.

Ueno had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage while at work, and passed away at the University of Tokyo. When Hachiko arrived at the train station that day, Ueno would not get off the train, and the dog was distraught. Hachiko figured that maybe he would return the next day, and arrived at the same time the following day.

Hachiko would continue to do this, hoping that his owner would one day return from the college and head back home. Hachiko was shooed away by those that didn’t know his story at first, until one of Ueno’s students had seen Hachiko at the train station. People became much more friendly around Hachiko when the student wrote articles about the dog’s loyalty and how he was still waiting for Ueno.

This made Hachiko a folk legend, and those that were trying to avoid the dog at the station were now embracing his presence, giving him food and affection. Every single day at the exact same time, Hachiko would arrive at the station, and even those that weren’t taking the train made sure to arrive so that they could see Hachiko in person.

Hachiko’s story spread across the rest of Japan, and he became a news headline for years, symbolizing loyalty and faithfulness in the Japanese culture. People were able to point Hachiko and tell each other “this is what we should be like to each other.” At the time, there were only a couple of dozen Akita purebred dogs in Japan, but that number would grow exponentially as many wanted a dog just like Hachiko in their own home.

Sadly, this story of supreme loyalty had to come to an end at some point, and that date came on March 8, 1935. Hachiko had passed away on the street in Shibuya near the train station, and the entire nation was in mourning. Not many dogs get an autopsy, but one was performed for Hachiko, and it was found that he had cancer and a dangerous infection.

The photo that you see here is on the day of Hachiko’s death, and it was the final photo ever taken of the loyal dog. Ueno’s wife, Yaeko, is the woman second from the right in the front row. Others that were in the photo were members of the staff at the train station. Hachiko would be cremated, with his ashes being buried next to Ueno’s.

To keep his legacy alive, Hachiko’s fur was stuffed and placed on the display at the National Science Museum in Tokyo. Many monuments were left for Hachiko, including statues and plaques. There have also been many movies in television shows, especially in Japan, that have adapted the story of Hachiko, including “The Tale of Hachiko” that was a major success in Japan.

Hachiko’s loyalty has also been memorialized in many other ways in entertainment, including the memorable “Jurassic Bark” episode of “Futurama” in which the main character’s dog waits outside of a pizza store for more than a decade before passing away. Video games, books, movies, television shows; they’ve all paid tribute to one of history’s most famous dogs.

Despite all of those obvious references to Hachiko’s life, not many outside of Japan knew his story until recent years. Hachiko is an icon in Japan, but it wasn’t until this photo made the rounds on the internet that people realized what a heart wrenching story he left behind. A photo of people mourning over a dog that’s passed away is sad enough, but even harder to look now that you know the backstory.

If you’re ever in Japan, just ask anybody there to tell you more about Hachiko, and they’re likely to have plenty of stories, especially if they were around in the 1940s or 1950s. To take a look for yourself, just visit the Hachiko Memorial Statue at the Shibuya train station, and you’re likely to get a tear in your eye.

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