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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: HistoricalHistory. Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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John Wayne Gacy

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Where:
Unknown
When:
Unknown
Summary:
The "Killer Clown" murdered dozens of boys and men in Illinois during the 1980s. He was sentenced to death for these crimes and executed in 1994.

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John Wayne Gacy



  Where:
Unknown

  When:
Unknown

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In the United States alone, it’s estimated that more than 40 percent of people are afraid of clowns, otherwise known as coulrophobia. While it’s a fear that’s been around since the inception of clowns, it was only made worse because of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy. This soulless killer would often dress up as a clown and was even invited to birthday parties and local events as his clown character, but nobody knew just how sinister he was.Advertisements:


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Gacy ended up taking the lives of more than 30 people, all of which were males with many of them being underage. Gacy is one of the most horrific serial killers that’s been documented in United States history, but hasn’t been able to hurt anyone for more than a quarter century now. During the 1970s, though, the fear of Gacy was very real, especially in the American midwest.

What you see here is a young man that was still far away from the violent acts that he would commit, instead being the victim of violence himself. Gacy was born on March 17, 1942 in Chicago into a family that had lived in fear of the patriarch, John. John was a war veteran that drank too much and lashed out on all of the other family members, with Gacy himself taking refuge with his two sisters. Gacy had wanted nothing more than to make his father happy to avoid his wrath, but was always the child that was picked out for failing to live up to expectations.

“My dad was domineering,” Gacy said. “He had a different set of values, but also a very stern individual. My dad drank a lot, and when he drank a lot, he was abusive to my mother and to me. But I never swung at my dad, because I loved him for what he stood for.”

Growing up in fear of his father, it was impossible for Gacy to live a normal childhood, and even into his adult years had felt the disapproval. Tired of dealing with his family, Gacy decided to move far away for a few months, heading to Las Vegas where he had worked at a funeral home before returning to Chicago. He then went to college where he graduated with a business degree, eventually working as a salesman before running multiple KFC fast food restaurants.

Throughout the mid 1960s, Gacy had continued to live a life that many would consider extremely normal. He was working a job that paid him very well, got married to a woman named Marlynn Myers and had two children. His relationship with his father had improved, and it should’ve been the happy ending that followed his tragic childhood. Instead, it was just the beginning of one of the worst crime sprees that the United States has ever seen.

Gacy had given alcohol to some of his younger employees and made advances on them, with his first crime being committed in the summer of 1967 when an underage boy had been a victim of Gacy’s immorality. Multiple charges of deviant acts were filed against Gacy while he was living in Iowa, landing himself in prison for the first time. After exhibiting good behavior in jail, Gacy was paroled after less than two years, though he was supposed to serve an entire decade.

It didn’t take long before the man who many had thought was reformed had been charged once again, but his parolers hadn’t caught wind of the latest crime as he had committed it in Illinois. He instead lived out most of the 1970s near Chicago where he was an active member of the community that engaged in politics and events that included dressing up as a clown for many occasions, joining a club of clowns that did so.

It was during this time that Gacy had gotten away from his charges while on parole and doing work as a clown that he had his first murder victim. That initial victim was Timothy McCoy, who was just 16 years old in early 1972 when he had been murdered by Gacy, burying him underneath his home. More victims would be claimed over the course of nearly seven years, all of which were in Illinois. It’s believed that there were 33 victims in total for Gacy, with the possibility of even more.

In the days leading up to Christmas in 1972, Gacy had come forth and confessed to many of his murders, leading to police to his home where they saw the gruesome and shocking scene of the victims having been buried in his crawl space. After their investigation, authorities charged Gacy with more than 30 murders and several other charges. Though the defense pleaded insanity, Gacy was still found guilty on all counts and was sentenced to death, with all of his appeals coming up short while he waited in Chester, Illinois on death row.

On May 10, 1994, Gacy was executed at the age of 52 via lethal injection, leaving behind two children and two ex-wives. The investigations continued well after his death with the hopes of identifying more of the victims that hadn’t been previously, as well as searching for more potential victims that Gacy didn’t disclose. This is likely something that will continue for years, while the book is still open for the families of many of these victims.

A couple of years before his execution, Gacy even tried to maintain his innocence. “When they paint the image that I was this monster who picked up these altar boys along the streets and swatted them like flies, I said, ‘This is ludicrous,’” he said. “You’re basing this garbage on what you’ve heard of me…If you want to charge me with anything, charge me with complicity in two of the murders. Don’t look at me as an innocent babe of the woods.”

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