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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
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760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Osama bin Laden

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Where:
Unknown
When:
Unknown
Summary:
Founder of al-Qaeda, bin Laden is largely responsible for countless heinous acts, including the September 11 attacks in the United States. He was shot and killed by US forces in May, 2011.

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Osama bin Laden



  Where:
Unknown

  When:
Unknown

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In the 21st century, there’s been no person more notorious than Osama bin Laden. After all, bin Laden was the founder of the al-Qaeda organization that had been seen around the globe as the deadliest terrorists. Because of their actions, bin Laden was pointed to as an incredibly dangerous man that was capable of mass destruction. After several attacks that al-Qaeda carried out, bin Laden became the world’s most wanted man. It took many years for bin Laden to be found after his attacks, but now it’s been nearly a decade since he’s been eliminated.Advertisements:


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Though often associated with Afghanistan because of al-Qaeda, bin Laden was born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on March 10, 1957. His father had dozens of children throughout his life and was a very wealthy man as he worked as a contractor with some very notable clients, though he was married to bin Laden’s mother for only a short period of time as he had been married to over 20 different women during his life. Bin Laden’s mother then remarried where he grew up with only a few of his siblings, and was described as a solid student.

Bin Laden’s mother, Alia Ghanem, talked about her son in recent years, saying that he was “shy” but also that “He was a very good kid and he loved me so much.” Bin Laden grew up with the Sunni Muslim belief, and became more religious as he made his way through childhood. It wasn’t until college that bin Laden started to develop more radicalized ideals, with his mother saying that “He was a very good child until he met some people who pretty much brainwashed him in his early 20s. You can call it a cult. I would always tell him to stay away from them, and he would never admit to what he was doing.”

By the end of the 1970s, bin Laden had become a member of the Muslim Brotherhood and joined Afghanistan’s side against the Soviet Union during the war between the two sides. The United States had also aided Afghanistan during this time, seeing bin Laden as an ally of sorts. Things would then change in the 1980s as bin laden became more of a militant rather than simply providing financial support, forming the Islamic group al-Qaeda, quickly gaining a lot of followers.

Around this time, bin Laden had denounced the United States and had been a key component in attacks that were carried out in the Middle East and around the world. This included the original bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993 and other bombings in cities such as Aden, Yemen and Mazar, Afghanistan. Bin Laden became an American target on one of the highest levels in 1998 when al-Qaeda had orchestrated a bombing of the United States Embassy in cities throughout the Middle East.

Unfortunately, things would only get worse with the largest terrorist attack in United States history. That day came on September 11, 2001 when a pair of airplanes had been hijacked, flying into the World Trade Center in New York City, with another plane crashing into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. and a fourth that was retaken by passengers and crashing in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It was estimated that nearly 3,000 people lost their lives as a result of the attacks, with several thousand more suffering from injuries and long-lasting effects from ground zero.

Bin Laden had first said that al-Qaeda was not responsible for the attacks of 9/11, but eventually the news came out that he had talked about the attack in the years leading up to that fateful day. A few years down the road, bin Laden had fully taken credit for the attacks, while he was already been wanted by international police and U.S. officials.

Bin Laden even issued a letter to the American people following the attacks. “We also advise you to pack your luggage and get out of our lands,” he said. “We desire for your goodness, guidance and righteousness, so do not force us to send you back as cargo in coffins…If you fail to respond to all these conditions, then prepare for fight with the Islamic Nation.”

After a decade of being the most wanted man by the F.B.I. for the acts that were committed on September 11, 2001, the United States had finally started to close in on bin Laden thanks to the C.I.A. initiative known as Operation Neptune Spear. There had been many rumors over the years regarding bin Laden’s whereabouts, and it was found that he had a compound that was set up in Abbottabad, allowing the C.I.A. to surveil the area to set up Neptune Spear.

The operation was carried out on May 2, 2011 in the early hours of the morning with President Barack Obama observing from the White House. Nearly 80 members of the Navy SEALs team had made their way to the compound, initiating the raid. Bin Laden was found on the third floor of the compound, with the SEALs shooting him as soon as he was discovered in the home. The team then radioed in that the operation was a success with bin Laden’s body being taken by the SEAL team.

The body was not produced to the public, however, which has led to some conspiracy theories. The United States said that bin Laden was buried at sea while covered in a sheet, though the country is certain that they got their man. The reaction to bin Laden’s death was felt around the world, with many people celebrating, especially in the United States. News started to make the rounds at sporting events and more, with chants of “U-S-A” being heard. World leaders such as Stephen Harper, the former Prime Minister of Canada, summed it up best by saying that there was a “sober satisfaction” in bin Laden’s capture and death.

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