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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: HistoricalHistory. Posted by
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Robert Kennedy

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Where:
Los Angeles, California
When:
1968-06-05
Summary:
Shortly after being declared the winner in two presidential primaries, Robert Kennedy was mortally wounded by assassin Sirhan Sirhan.

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Robert Kennedy



  Where:
Los Angeles, California

  When:
1968-06-05

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“Each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.” The seventh of nine children born to Joseph and Rose Kennedy, Robert Francis Kennedy came into this world on November 20, 1925, in Brookline, Massachusetts. With his family’s prominence in New England, Kennedy lived a fairly upscale childhood alongside his siblings but truly set himself apart as he developed a great compassion for others, a trait he shared with his mother. Never quite getting the attention he wanted from his older brothers, Joseph and John, Kennedy spent most of his time alone studying American history. “I was very awkward,” he recalled. “I was pretty quiet most of the time and I didn’t mind being alone.” Advertisements:


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Lining his bedroom walls with pictures of the United States presidents, Kennedy attended three different boarding schools before he enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve as a seaman apprentice just six weeks before his 18th birthday in 1943. He completed his training requirements at Bates College in Maine and spent all of his free time studying before tragedy struck in August 1944 when his brother Joseph was killed in action. Kennedy was later granted release from naval-officer training to serve aboard the USS Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. destroyer in 1945 and, a year later, he was honorably discharged from the Navy.

Following his service in the Navy, Kennedy entered Harvard where he played varsity football and spent his free time helping his brother, John, campaign for the United States Representative seat in 1946. He graduated with his degree in political science in 1948 and spent the next six months touring Europe and the Middle East as a correspondent for the Boston Post on the RMS Queen Mary. Upon his return, he enrolled at the University of Virginia School of Law in Charlottesville. Over the next few months, he extended his reach as a journalist and law student before graduating in 1951 just shortly after marrying Ethel Skakel in June 1950 and starting a family with the birth of his daughter, Kathleen, in July 1951.

With his growing family, Kennedy’s career interests blossomed as he worked as a lawyer in Washington, D.C. and later stepped in to manage JFK’s successful United States Senate campaign in Massachusetts. With his brother winning the seat, Kennedy’s hard work paid off once again when he stepped in as Assistant Counsel on the US Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Over the next few years, he served in various roles and published his book, The Enemy Within, before joining forces again with his brother for JFK’s bid for the White House in 1960.

With his older brother in office, Kennedy was appointed Attorney General of the United States from 1961 to 1964. He served as one of the president’s closest White House advisers and made a significant impression on American history as he aided in thwarting organized crime and advocating for civil rights. “We will not stand or be aloof—we will move,” he said in a 1961 speech. Over the next few years, his commitment to civil rights blossomed as he worked alongside renowned leaders like Martin Luther King Jr.

Amid his expanding political footprint, Kennedy’s armor was attacked in 1963 when his brother, President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated on November 22 in Dallas, Texas. His brother’s death had a profound impact on Kennedy as his passion for politics shifted. Nine months after his brother’s assassination, he left his cabinet position and successfully won a seat in the United States Senate. He served in the Senate from 1965 to 1968. In March 1968, he announced his bid for the White House stating, “I do not run for the presidency merely to oppose any man but to propose new policies. I run because I am convinced that this country is on a perilous course and because I have such strong feelings about what must be done, and I feel that I am obliged to do all I can.”

Death and Legacy

Kennedy was well on the way to becoming the second Kennedy in the White House after he won the California primary in June 1968. He addressed his supporters in the ballroom at The Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles and later took a shortcut through the hotel kitchen to the pressroom despite his bodyguard advising him against the route. Kennedy entered the crowded kitchen and shook hands with the staff just as 24-year-old Sirhan Sirhan opened fire with a .22-caliber revolver. The young Palestinian shot Senator Kennedy three times, wounding five others. Two men wrestled Sirhan to the ground as the hotel busboy cradled Kennedy’s head in his lap and placed a rosary in his hand. “Is everybody OK?” Kennedy asked.

Kennedy died moments later as he uttered, “Don’t lift me,” to the first responders on scene as they moved him onto the stretcher. He was rushed to Los Angeles’ Central Receiving Hospital and then to the Good Samaritan Hospital where surgeons tried desperately to remove the bullet and bone fragments from his brain. Over 24 hours later, the 42-year-old Kennedy was pronounced dead on June 6, 1968. During the funeral mass, Kennedy’s only surviving brother, Ted, honored his brother’s legacy saying, “My brother need not be idealized or enlarged in death beyond what he was in life; to be remembered simply as a good and decent man who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it.”

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