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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
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760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Saddam Hussein

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Where:
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When:
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Summary:
A brutal dictator, Hussein killed hundreds of thousands of his own people (as well as hundreds of thouands more during invasions of other countriees) during his tenure as President of Iraq. For his cruelty, he became known as the "Butcher of Baghdad."

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Saddam Hussein



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It can be hard to tell what someone will become when they’re young, and people that make their way to power are no exception. For many years, Saddam Hussein was seen as an asset, but eventually ruled his native Iraq as a dictator for more than 20 years where he earned himself the nickname, “The Butcher of Baghdad.” This is because it’s estimated that around 300,000 people lost their lives as a result of Hussein’s regime, which is why many celebrated the fact that he was removed from power and executed after a lengthy trial.Advertisements:


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Long before becoming one of the world’s most notorious leaders, Hussein was born on April 28, 1937 in Al-Awja, Iraq. Hussein grew up in different households as his father had passed away before his birth, though he’d spend most of his time in Baghdad. Iraq is a country that’s seen many major changes to their government, with Hussein getting involved early in being a revolutionary

When talking about Hussein in the early 1990s, the CIA said that “Saddam’s psyche was shaped by his rejection by his natural father and mother.” Hussein then made his way into politics when he joined the Ba’ath Party and joined in on an uprising that found him being placed with the Iraqi Regional Branch in 1964. Four years later, Hussein would have a quick rise to power when he became Iraq’s vice president while Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr was in charge.

During this time, Hussein was in charge of the Iraqi military, and many saw him as the true leader of the government in general. In 1979, al-Bakr was getting older and his health was in a decline, with Hussein forcing him to resign. This officially put Hussein in charge as the president of Iraq, putting fear into many of his own citizens. During his time in charge, Hussein used his power to stay in office, taking out anyone that dared to lead another political uprising.

Propaganda was also a big part of Hussein’s regime as he wanted to leave an image that he was what was best for the country. Statues, posters and just about anything else you can imagine were put up while any opposing propaganda was taken down. Because of this, Hussein won his elections with ease even while being involved with many conflicts with other nations. This included the first time that the United States got involved with the Gulf War. Despite the U.S. claiming victory, Hussein had also claimed victory to try and solidify himself as president and continuing to squash any uprisings that resulted in many Iraqi deaths.

“I know that there are scores of people plotting to kill me,” Hussein said. “And this is not difficult to understand. After all, did we not seize power by plotting against our predecessors? However, I am far cleverer than they are. I know they are conspiring to kill me long before they actually start planning to do it. This enables me to get them before they have the faintest chance of striking me.”

Hussein maintained his spot as the Iraqi president throughout the tumultuous 1990s that saw a lot of sanctions against his country. More invasions would soon follow, but Hussein still refused to back down or give up his position. Although the United States had originally been an ally for Hussein, things were certainly heating up at this time. He claimed that when he came into power that Iraqi citizens “barely had anything” and that he made the country more prosperous, but many felt that it was the opposite case for Hussein.

After years of seeming like Hussein would be in power for a long time to come, the United States had invaded Iraq in 2003 after President George W. Bush had said that Hussein was holding onto weapons of mass destruction with plans to use them. While Iraq had ceased their operations, the U.S. stayed within the country until the Hussein regime was toppled. Just a couple of months after giving an interview to the American media, Hussein had gone missing from the public eye.

The United States military had been involved in a hunt for Hussein for months in 2003, taking until nearly the end of the year until he was found. The operation that saw Hussein captured was Operation Red Dawn with photos of the Iraqi leader surfacing shortly after. During the operation, Hussein’s sons were killed in a firefight while Hussein himself was apprehended without serious injury and was placed into a trial.

Hussein was charged with crimes of the highest order against humanity for being responsible for the deaths of thousands according to said charges. After more than two years of the trial process, Hussein was ordered to be executed at the end of 2006. Initially wanting a firing squad, Hussein was instead hanged with third party video of the execution being released to the public. Hussein was 69 years old at the time of his death and was replaced by a council that eventually elected Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer as Iraq’s president.

There are still mixed feelings about the United States’ handling of the Iraqi invasion and the punishment for Hussein. Many were excited, though, including one Iraqi citizen that said “It was a very special day, especially for my father and my family. We suffered a lot. I don’t know how to describe, but the joy was overwhelming everybody. So everybody was in the street, and everybody was firing in celebration and everybody was smiling…so it was like a special day.”

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