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Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don’t Want You To See
Publication: Historical History.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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TransAsia Flight 235 Seconds Before Crash

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Where:
Taipei, Taiwan
When:
2015-02-04
Summary:
TransAsia flight 235 crashed into a river shortly after taking off from a Taiwanese airport

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TransAsia Flight 235 Seconds Before Crash



  Where:
Taipei, Taiwan

  When:
2015-02-04

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or read more about below

Traveling by air is one of the safest possible ways to travel, especially as technology improves and expertise in aviation becomes stronger than ever. There are only a handful of fatal crashes around the world each year, with the United States alone not accounting for any in the past several years.

Unfortunately, one of those fatal crashes that made headlines occurred on February 4, 2015, and it was well documented via dashcam videos. The photo you see here was taken from a dashcam in Taipei, Taiwan, and it’s TransAsia Airways Flight 235. The flight was supposed to be traveling from Taipei to Kinmen, Taiwan, but barely made it out of the airport, crashing just 3.4 miles away.

Things seemed fine before takeoff, but just two minutes after heading down the runway, pilots said that one of the engines had flamed out. When it reached 1,500 feet, one of the pilots accidentally shut down the other working engine, causing it to have a sharp descent. As it was coming back down to the ground, the plane took a sharp left across traffic and clipped its left wing on a viaduct, crashing into the ground.

There were 58 passengers on the flight that included five crew members, with 43 losing their lives. There were another two people on the ground that were injured (but survived) and a total of 15 survivors aboard the plane. Sadly, this was the second flight with just a few months that TransAsia Airways had that resulted in a fatal crash.

Survivors of the crash were in the waters below, and boats were dispatched about half an hour after the crash to rescue those that lived. It then took several hours to recover the wreckage of the flight from the water, and it wasn’t until the next day that the pilot and co-pilot were extracted from the plane.

Investigators determined that the crash itself could have been prevented as the plane only needed one engine to operate. After the first flamed out, the plane could have been turned around to return to the Taipei airport for repairs. However, the captain of the aircraft had shut off the working engine, and it was too late to start it back up due to their low altitude. There’s even a recording just before the crash where the pilot is heard saying, “Wow, pulled back the wrong side throttle.”

Thomas Wang, the executive director of the Taiwan Aviation Safety Council said that “The sensor connector, in layman’s terms, you would say was in a situation where it didn’t connect normally,” when referring to what caused the first engine to malfunction. Had the captain pulled back on the correct throttle, the malfunctioning engine could have been repaired while the rest of the power focused on the remaining engine.

Investigative reports determined that the pilot had failed in a flight simulation the year before, but then came back the next month and passed it. Liao Chien-tsung was the pilot with nearly 5,000 flying hours, while co-pilot Liu Tze-chung had nearly 7,000 flying hours. The third member of the crew in the cockpit was an experienced pilot that had more than 16,000 hours under his belt.

Those who had met the captain said that they had their concerns about his abilities, saying that he was “a little nervous during line operations” and that he “had a tendency of rushing to perform the procedures without coordination with the co-pilot.” As a result of the crash (and the one from the previous year), TransAsia was forced to respond by increasing the training of their pilots, suspending those that hadn’t passed their flight tests.

TransAsia was also fined for revealing confidential information to a publication while the investigation was ongoing, and one source even said that the pilot knew about the engine’s troubles before taking off, choosing to ignore the problem. These anonymous reports have been denied by TransAsia, though not proven right or wrong otherwise.

Many TransAsia flights were canceled as a result of the crash and increased regulations for pilot ability, and the airline offered the families of those who died in the crash nearly $500,000 for their loss. Many accepted the settlement while others have chosen to look for more. That could prove to be difficult for some of these families as TransAsia ceased operations in November 2016 with growing distrust of the company’s safety and transparency.

The investigative report of the crash was finally concluded in 2016, claiming that “The crew didn’t respond to the stall warnings in a timely and effective manner. The aircraft stalled and continued descent during the attempted engine restart.”

After the crash, TransAsia said that they were going to add improved equipment the next year, but their operations didn’t make it that far. While many plane crashes are left with a lot of questions, it seems that in the case of TransAsia Flight 235, almost all of them have been answered. Sadly, it would be just another six months when the next fatal accidental crash happened with Trigana Air Service Flight 267 crashing en route from Jayapura, Indonesia to Oksibil, Indonesia.

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